Cataracts

Cataracts

A cataract is a clouding of the internal lens of the eye that leads to a decrease in vision. As the lens becomes cloudier, vision becomes blurry and distorted. People with cataracts commonly experience difficulty in appreciating colors and changes in contrast, driving, reading, recognizing faces, and coping with glare from bright lights. Common risk factors for developing cataracts are including, aging, medications, eye trauma and surgeries, smoking, and unprotected excessive sunlight exposure.

Most people will have a slight cataract in one or both eyes by age 60. Most cataracts progress slowly over 5-15 years. An annual eye exam is recommended for people over age 60 to measure eyesight and evaluate overall eye health.

If you have questions regarding cataracts, call our office or ask Dr. Craig B. Kurtz at your next appointment.

A cataract is a clouding of the lens inside the eye that leads to a decrease in vision. Left untreated, it is the most common cause of blindness and is conventionally treated with surgery. Vision loss occurs because opacification of the lens obstructs light from passing through and being focused on to the retina at the back of the eye. The most common cause for cataracts is biological aging and over-exposure to ultraviolet light. Seeing through a cataract is similar to looking through a foggy window. People with cataracts commonly experience difficulty in appreciating colors and changes in contrast, driving, reading, recognizing faces, and coping with glare from bright lights. While there is no guaranteed way to avoid cataracts, wearing eyewear and sunwear that block 100% UVA and UVB rays can slow the onset as well as decrease the exposure to direct sunlight. Cataracts do not need to interfere with your lifestyle. If you’re concerned that you may be suffering from cataracts, call our office today to schedule an eye health evaluation.

We regret to inform you that due to the current health crisis regarding COVID-19, the Vision Clinic will be closed. We will send out emails when we re-open. We have taken into consideration concerns from patients and staff, as well as recommendations by the CDC and American Optometric Association to make this decision. All patients with appointments during this time will receive a phone call regarding rescheduling. If you currently have an appointment it is canceled. When we reopen you will be called and rescheduled. Any patients with needs or concerns can call or email the clinic. We will continue to provide emergency eye care. We will continue to re-evaluate this ongoing pandemic and send updates when appropriate.